Doctor Who: Tin Dog Podcast
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TDP 211: SJSA 5.2 The Curse of Clyde Langer

The Curse of Clyde Langer is a two-part story of The Sarah Jane Adventures which will broadcast on CBBC on 10 and 11 October 2011.[1] It is the second story of the fifth and last series.

Contents

 [hide

[edit] Plot

[edit] Part One

At school, Clyde shows Rani The Silver Bullet, a comic he made. While Sarah Jane has a talk with Mr. Chandra on Sky's first day at school, a strange storm interrupts the meeting, when fish begin to fall out of the sky. According to Mr Smith, it is normal for the weather to be raining fish though the fish that day was abnormally large. Thinking it might be related to an old superstition involving a totem pole, the gang visits a museum that just opened an exhibition of totem poles and other such items. Before the entrance, a homeless woman begs for money, which Clyde gives to her, stating it probably wasn't her fault she is out in the streets. While in the museum, Clyde gets a splinter from an old Mojave totem pole.

Dr Madigan explains the legend of the totem pole. Hetocumtek was a vicious warrior who fell out of the skies and tried to enslave the people on the Mojave plains. The Native American medicine men tricked the warrior, imprisoning him inside the totem pole. Sarah Jane suspects that Hetocumtek is both a warrior god and an alien. Having detected no alien signs of any kind the gang leaves.

That night, Clyde finished his comic and signs his name on it before falling asleep. He fails to notice that his name on all of his documents, including his comic, begins to mysteriously glow orange.

Walking to Sarah Jane's house, Clyde shows her The Silver Bullet. She at first takes interest in his comic. At the mention of his name, Clyde's name glows orange in Sarah Jane's eye. Suddenly, Sarah Jane takes a dislike of Clyde as she orders him to leave her house. At the front of the Chandra's residence, Clyde tries to tell Rani and Haresh his problem he had with Sarah Jane only to face the same conflict when Haresh says his name as it glows in their eyes. Haresh then expels him from school.

Getting ready for her first day of school, Sky enters the attic. Sarah Jane tells her she will return to the museum to see if there are any connections between the totem pole and the fish incident. When she mentions Clyde to Sarah Jane, she is instructed to stay away from him. Unaffected by the curse, Sky notices the sudden hatred Sarah Jane has for Clyde.

At the park, Clyde is treated kindly by Steve until his name is said. Barely escaping from Steve and his gang who was chasing after him, he enters the museum. Asking Dr Madigan about curses, Sarah Jane enters the museum where she advises her to keep away from Clyde. Dr Madigan, who said his name, orders the security guards to throw him out.

Clyde returns home where he sees his mum with an envelope addressed to him. Realizing what has happened, he begs her to let him stay after she called the police to capture him. Finally escaping, he walks out of Bannerman Road. Out in the streets in the middle of the rain, the homeless woman he helped offers to assist him as she holds out her hand.

[edit] Part Two

While his friends all turn on Clyde as a result from the curse, he meets a mysterious girl on the streets that helps him through the hardship of losing his friends and loved ones. She introduces herself as Ellie. Fearing the curse will do the same to her, Clyde introduces himself as Enrico Box. Ellie tells him about the Night Dragon, how people mysteriously disappears because of the Night Dragon.

At the museum, lightning bursts out of the totem pole. Sarah Jane was called in to investigate the suspicions. Scanning, Sarah Jane receives detections of alien energy. She then sees one of the faces' eyes on the pole glow orange. Meanwhile, Sky at school notices how Sarah Jane and Rani hates Clyde but both fails to think of a reason why.

Sarah Jane suddenly tears up in the attic although she doesn't know why. The same thing occurs to Rani later in the car as well as Clyde's mum when Sky visits her. All of them feel as if they are missing a person in their life yet they do not realize who it is.

Clyde and Ellie visits Mystic Mags, who tells them the Night Dragon is coming and that it will take one of them. She also foresees something else that has put a mark on Clyde, a curse.

The totem pole back at the museum begins to cause the weather to rain and thunder heavily as the faces begins to become alive. Within the rain, Clyde and Ellie connects with each other, keeping themselves warm by burning The Silver Bullet.

Back in the attic, Sarah Jane and Rani share their tearing experiences. Sky, after being informed that Hetocumtek is getting stronger, discovers that Clyde activated the warrior god when he receives a splinter, creating the curse. She realizes that as long as Clyde is out in the streets, the alien warrior god will get stronger. Sky also sees that his name is the key to stopping Hetocumtek. She manages to convince Sarah Jane and Rani to say his name repeatedly to break the curse upon them.

Clyde draws a portrait of Ellie and shows it to her. She then kisses him and tells him she will be back, leaving to get coffee. Sarah Jane and the gang arrives, bringing Clyde to the attic, though it was without choice. There, Mr Smith transports the totem pole to the attic where it begins to fight back, creating lightning and destruction. Clyde, holding onto the pole, shouts, "My name is Clyde Langer!" disintegrating the pole.

Clyde, welcomed back by his friends and family, tries to search for Ellie. He asks many people only to find they do not know where or who she is. Clyde suggests they use Mr Smith to track her, but Rani points out her name on a sign, indicating that Ellie took the name. A man there saw Ellie board a truck named "Night Dragon Haulage". He explains that the truck driver occasionally would drive some people to other places for a better life. At night in his room, Clyde reminisces about Ellie as he stares at his portrait of her.

[edit] Cast Notes

[edit] Reception

Charlie Jane Anders of io9 thought this story to be as good as stories in the parent show Doctor Who.[2]

[edit] References

  1. ^ "The Sarah Jane Adventures – The Curse of Clyde Langer" (Press release). BBC Press Office. Retrieved 2011-10-06.
  2. ^ Anders, Charlie Jane (12 October 2011). "The Rare Sarah Jane Adventures Episode That's As Good As Doctor Who". io9. Retrieved 14 October 2011.

[edit] External links

Direct download: 211_curse_.mp3
Category:podcast -- posted at: 6:15am UTC

TDP 210: Doctor Who (Twice) on BBC Points of View

Doctor Who Has been mentioned on BBC Points of View Twice in two weeks. heres my thoughts...

Contact the Points of View team by email: pov@bbc.co.uk

Telephone: 0370 908 3199 (calls are charged at local rate, mobile tariffs will vary)

Or write to us at POV, BBC Birmingham, Birmingham, B1 1AY

You can also send your opinions via video-phone or webcam. Send your video submissions to pov@bbc.co.uk.

Direct download: TDP_210_Points_of_View.mp3
Category:podcast -- posted at: 6:00am UTC

TDP 209: SJSA 5.1 Sky and The Upcoming S4 DVD

Reprinted from Wikipedia with thanks and respect

Sky (The Sarah Jane Adventures)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
25 – Sky
The Sarah Jane Adventures story
Cast
Starring
Others
Production
Writer Phil Ford
Director Ashley Way
Script editor Gary Russell
Producer Brian Minchin
Phil Ford (co-producer)
Executive producer(s) Russell T Davies
Nikki Wilson
Production code 5.1 and 5.2
Series Series 5
Length 2 episodes, 25 minutes each
Originally broadcast 3 & 4 October 2011
Chronology
← Preceded by Followed by →
Goodbye, Sarah Jane Smith The Curse of Clyde Langer

Sky is a two-part story of The Sarah Jane Adventures which was broadcast on CBBC on 3 and 4 October 2011.[1] It is the first story of the fifth and last series.

Contents

 [hide

[edit] Plot

[edit] Part One

A meteor crashes in the middle of a junk yard to reveal a metal man. Meanwhile, Sarah Jane discovers a baby on her doorstep in the middle of the night who can create power surges. Sarah Jane calls Rani and Clyde over for them to help her and after Clyde shows his paternal side, Sarah Jane and Rani travel to the site of the meteor crash. There they are met by Professor Celeste Rivers who investigates the site with them. Sarah Jane and Rani find a homeless man who saw the metal man and describes him to them; they then discover that the metal man is heading to Bannerman Road.

Meanwhile an alien woman named 'Miss Myers' appears at a nuclear power station and discovers that there was a power surge in Bannerman Road. She makes her way to the Chandras' residence and Gita announces that Sarah Jane has just fostered a baby, as Gita had seen Sarah Jane earlier. Miss Myers makes her way to the garden where Clyde and the baby named Sky are to discover that the metal man is about to attack them. Miss Myers saves Clyde and Baby Sky and takes them to the Power Station. Miss Myers reveals that she is Sky's mother and is also an alien.

Sarah Jane and Rani return to the house to discover that Clyde and Sky have gone. Mr Smith locates Clyde at the power station and Sarah Jane and Rani make their way to the station. They find Clyde, Sky and Miss Myers who reveals that her species, the Fleshkind, are fighting a war against the Metalkind. She also reveals that Sky is a weapon who will put an end to the war and as she says this the metal man walks in. Sky then transforms from a baby into a twelve-year-old girl.

[edit] Part Two

At Miss Myers' command, Sky unintentionally attacks the metal man with a burst of energy. Miss Myers reveals that Sky was made and "grown" in a Fleshkind laboratory as a weapon to destroy the Metalkind. Sarah Jane and the gang escapes with Sky before Miss Myers could get ahold of her. Miss Myers then tells the metal man he would help her get Sky and has him wired up.

Sky, who is still experiencing the world and words around her, is brought into the attic where Mr Smith scans her. He concludes that Sky's metamorphosis was caused by her synthetic DNA and was done to maximize her effectiveness as a bomb. Full activation would not only destroy the Metalkind but Sky herself as well. Although there is no cure for the energy from the Metalkind's presence would activate Sky's power, she can still be "defused". However, only Miss Myers can disarm her genetic trigger. Sky agrees to go there, stating that she might die anyway.

Back at the power station, Sarah Jane tells Sky to stay with Clyde and Rani. With the absence of Sarah Jane at the time, Sky escapes, running inside the factory, trying to help Sarah Jane. Meanwhile, Sarah Jane, who is taken to Miss Myers, learns that the damaged metal man is wired up to the nuclear core in order for him to act as a homing device. Miss Meyers also reveals she reprogrammed his mind as he swears veangance on all flesh kind, including Earth's inhabitants, thus bringing their war to Earth. Believing that the Metalkind will be destroyed upon their arrival on Earth, she activates the calling of the Metalkind. Downstairs, Sarah Jane meets up with Sky, who tells her she must save Earth and goes up to the nuclear core room. Sarah Jane then orders Clyde and Rani to shut down the nuclear reactor in the control room before heading after Sky, whose activation started from the presence of the metal man and Metalkind's portal opened by Miss Myers.

In the control room, Clyde and Rani discover the Nuclear Rod Regulation System and removes the rods based on the order of the visible spectrum. They were successful in closing the reactor as the portal closes with a large power outage. The energy from the portal backlashed on Sky, destroying her genetic programming as a bomb. Miss Myers doesn't want the child anymore for she is no longer a weapon. The metal man, who reveals that he saved some of the portal's energy, breaks loose and uses the energy as he takes Miss Myers with him.

Sarah Jane explains Sky's appearance to Gita and Haresh back at Bannerman Road, telling them the adoption agency had a mixup. Some traces of Sky's electric powers are still present. In the attic, Sarah Jane finds the Shopkeeper and the Captain, previously met in Lost in Time. He reveals it was him who placed infant Sky on her doorstep. The Shopkeeper, answering Sarah Jane's question of their existence, tells her that he and the Captain are "servants of the universe". He then gives Sky the decision to leave with him in which she declines and stays with Sarah Jane as her adopted daughter. He then disappears before Sarah Jane could ask him any further. She then says they will find out who he is soon....

[edit] Continuity

[edit] Production

This was the first story to be aired following the death of Elisabeth Sladen.

[edit] Notes

The ending credits for part one has mistakenly been put onto part 2 ending credits Luke Smith (Tommy Knight) and Baby Sky did not appear in part 2 and The Shopkeeper from Lost in Time was uncredited.

[edit] References

  1. ^ "The Sarah Jane Adventures – Sky" (Press release). BBC Press Office. Retrieved 2011-09-15.

[edit] External links

Direct download: TDP_209_SJSA_5_1_Sky_S4_DVD.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:26am UTC

Taken from Wikipedia with thankks and respect.

The Wedding of River Song

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
223 – "The Wedding of River Song"
Doctor Who episode
Cast
Others
Production
Writer Steven Moffat
Director Jeremy Webb
Executive producer(s)
Series Series 6
Length 45 mins
Originally broadcast 1 October 2011
Chronology
← Preceded by Followed by →
"Closing Time" 2011 Christmas special

"The Wedding of River Song" is the thirteenth and final episode of the sixth series of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, and was first broadcast on BBC One, BBC America and Space on 1 October 2011.

Contents

 [hide

[edit] Plot

The Doctor, aware of his death at the fixed point of time on 22 April 2011 at Lake Silencio, attempts to track down the Silence to learn why he must die. He encounters the Teselecta shapeshifting robot and its miniaturised crew who are currently posing as one of the members of the Silence; through them, the Doctor is led to the living head of Dorium Maldovar, one of the Doctor's allies taken by the Order of the Headless Monks. Dorium reveals that the Silence is dedicated to avert the Doctor's "terrifying" future, warning him that "On the fields of Trenzelor, at the fall of the Eleventh, a question will be asked - one that must never be answered. And Silence must fall when the question is asked." The Doctor continues to refuse to go to Lake Silencio until he discovers his old friend, Brigadier Lethbridge-Stewart, has passed away. The Doctor then accepts his fate. To avoid crossing his own time stream, he gives the Teselecta crew the envelopes to deliver to Amy, Rory, River Song, Canton Everett Delaware III, and a younger version of himself, inviting them to witness his death.

As shown in "The Impossible Astronaut", the Doctor joins his friends at Lake Silencio and then approaches the astronaut, now known to be a younger version of River Song trained to kill the Doctor by the Silence and Madame Kovarian. River does not want to kill him but is unable to fight the suit's control. The Doctor shows River her future self, sentenced to Stormcage prison for killing him, as evidence that her killing him is inevitable and that he forgives her for it. River, in the astronaut suit, surprises the Doctor by draining the suit's weapons systems and averting his death, despite his warning against interfering with a fixed point. Time becomes "stuck", and all of Earth's history begins to happen all at once, fixed at 5:02 p.m. on 22 April 2011.

In a time-confused London, Winston Churchill takes the Doctor, his "soothsayer", out from his locked cell to ask him about the stuck time. The Doctor explains the preceding events, but notices they have lost track of time and tally marks are appearing on his arms, indicating the presence of the Silence. After they observe a nest overhead, they are rescued by Amy and an a number of her soldiers. Due to the effects of the crack in her bedroom, Amy is cognisant of the altered timeline, though she has failed to notice that her trusted captain is Rory. Amy takes the Doctor to "Area 52", a hollowed-out pyramid among the Giza Necropolis, where they have captured over a hundred Silence and Madame Kovarian. River is also there, aware her actions have frozen time and refusing to allow the Doctor to touch her, an event that would cause time to become unstuck. They all wear "eyedrives"—eye patches identical to the one worn by Madame Kovarian that function as external memories, thus enabling them to remember the Silence.

They soon come to realise that this was a trap arranged by Kovarian, as the Silence begin to escape confinement and overload the eyedrives, torturing their users. The Doctor and River escape to the top of the pyramid while Amy and Rory fight off a wave of Silence and Amy realises who Rory is. Madame Kovarian discovers her own eyedrive is being overloaded; she dislodges it, but Amy forces it back in place with the intention of killing her, explaining that this is revenge for her taking Melody away. Amy and Rory regroup with River and the Doctor. River tries to convince the Doctor that this frozen timeline is acceptable and that he does not have to die, but the Doctor explains that all of reality will soon break down. The Doctor marries River on the spot, whispers something in her ear, declaring that he had just told her his name. He then requests that River allow him to prevent the universe's destruction. The two kiss, allowing reality to return to normal. At Lake Silencio, River kills the Doctor.

Some time later, Amy and Rory are visited by River, shortly after the events of "Flesh and Stone" in River's timeline. When Amy explains that she had recently witnessed the Doctor's death and regrets killing Kovarian, River reveals that the Doctor lied when he said he told her his name, instead saying "Look into my eye". The Doctor had in fact enlisted the Teselecta to masquerade as him at Lake Silenco, with the Doctor and his TARDIS miniaturised inside it ever since. The three celebrate the news that the Doctor is still alive. Elsewhere, the Doctor takes Dorium's head back to where it was stored; the Doctor explains that his perceived death will enable him to be forgotten. As the Doctor leaves, Dorium warns him that the question still awaits him, and calls it after him: "Doctor who?"

[edit] Prequel

A prequel to this episode was aired after the previous episode, "Closing Time". It was the fifth prequel in the series, the first four being for the episodes "The Impossible Astronaut", "The Curse of the Black Spot", "A Good Man Goes to War" and "Let's Kill Hitler". The prequel shows Area 52, with a clock stuck at the time of the Doctor's death, Silence kept in stasis and River Song wearing an eye patch in the same fashion as Madame Kovarian.[2] As all of this is happening, there is a voice-over of the children, the same as that from "Night Terrors" and the conclusion of "Closing Time". They sing "Tick tock / goes the clock" three times, and then "Doctor, / brave and good, / he turned away from violence. / When he / understood / the falling of the silence."

[edit] Continuity

Several scenes from the episode reuse footage from "The Impossible Astronaut" leading up to and immediately following the Doctor's death. The Doctor tells Dorium Maldovar, "I've been running all my life, why should I stop?", a precursive echo of his early, pre-death dialogue in "The Impossible Astronaut": "I've been running all my life...and now it's time to stop". Following the death of actor Nicholas Courtney, the Doctor learns in this episode that Brigadier Lethbridge-Stewart has died peacefully in a nursing home.[3] He last appeared in Doctor Who in Battlefield, and the character's final appearance came in The Sarah Jane Adventures story Enemy of the Bane.

When listing all the things he could do with the TARDIS' ability to travel in time, the Doctor suggests visiting Rose Tyler in her youth (which Jack Harkness admitted in "Utopia" to having done) to help her with her homework, attending all of Jack Harkness' stag parties in one night (several of his marriages are mentioned or alluded to in Torchwood episodes "Something Borrowed" and Children of Earth), and returning to Queen Elizabeth I (met in "The Shakespeare Code", and mentioned in "The End of Time, Part I", "The Beast Below" and "Amy's Choice").

When the Doctor awakens in Amy's rail car office, he tries to remind her of the crack in her wall ("The Eleventh Hour") and fiddles with one of her TARDIS models ("The Eleventh Hour", "Let's Kill Hitler"). Amy's sketches include a Cyberman's face ("The Pandorica Opens") a Dalek ("Victory of the Daleks", "The Pandorica Opens", "The Big Bang"), herself seated in the Pandorica ("The Pandorica Opens", "The Big Bang"), a Silurian ("The Hungry Earth", "Cold Blood", "A Good Man Goes to War"), herself wielding a cutlass and sporting a tricorn hat ("The Curse of the Black Spot"), a Smiler's face ("The Beast Below"), a vampire girl ("The Vampires of Venice"), the first time she met the Doctor ("The Eleventh Hour"), Rory and another centurion ("The Pandorica Opens"), a side of the Pandorica ("The Pandorica Opens", "The Big Bang"), a Weeping Angel's face ("The Time of Angels", "Flesh and Stone", "The God Complex"), and the TARDIS.

Winston Churchill and River Song describe Cleopatra as, respectively, "a dreadful woman but excellent dancer" and "a pushover". River posed as Cleopatra in "The Pandorica Opens". The Fourth Doctor claimed in The Masque of Mandragora to have learned swordsmanship from a captain in Cleopatra's bodyguard. Mickey Smith implied in "The Girl in the Fireplace" that the Doctor had had some romantic history with Cleopatra and that he affectionately called her 'Cleo'. River Song states that she used her hallucinogenic lipstick on President Kennedy; she used the lipstick on guards and Romans in "The Time of Angels" and "The Pandorica Opens".

A Silent calls Rory "the man who dies and dies again". Rory dies in "Cold Blood" and appears to die in "Amy's Choice" and "The Doctor's Wife". In reference to the Doctor telling River his name, she reprises the line "Rule One - The Doctor lies" from "The Big Bang" and "Let's Kill Hitler". In "Silence in the Library"/"Forest of the Dead", River whispers something in the Doctor's ear that makes him trust her, which the Doctor states just before her death was "my name" and that "There's only one reason I would ever tell anyone my name".

The Doctor also refers to the events and conversation shortly before her death in "Forest of the Dead", stating "You, me, handcuffs - must it always end this way?" when he is handcuffed in the pyramid and reversing part of his final exchange with her in the Library during their conversation by Lake Silencio ("Time can be rewritten" / "Don't you dare!", with the first line spoken by the Doctor in the Library and River by the lake). The episode's main plot centers around the damage caused by River when she tries to re-write a fixed point in time. The Doctor tries to do this himself in "The Waters of Mars" but fails when Adelade kills herself in order to keep history the same. Fixed points in time have also been mentioned in "The Fires of Pompeii" and "Cold Blood".

[edit] Outside references

Charles Dickens describes his upcoming Christmas special featuring ghosts from the past, present and future, alluding to A Christmas Carol.

[edit] Production

[edit] Cast notes

Within the alternate London several previous characters reappear, including Charles Dickens (Simon Callow) from "The Unquiet Dead", Winston Churchill (Ian McNeice) from "Victory of the Daleks", and the Silurian doctor Malohkeh (Richard Hope) from "Cold Blood". William Morgan Sheppard is credited for his brief appearance in the background of the Doctor's death scene, reprised from "The Impossible Astronaut".

Mark Gatiss previously played Professor Richard Lazarus in the episode "The Lazarus Experiment", and provided the uncredited voice of Danny Boy in "Victory of the Daleks" and "A Good Man Goes to War"[4] along with a number of roles in audio dramas based on the show. He has also written for the revived series of Doctor Who. He is credited in this episode under the pseudonym "Rondo Haxton", an ode to the American horror actor Rondo Hatton.

American television hostess Meredith Vieira recorded her report of Churchill's return to the Buckingham Senate in front of a green screen while filming a segment for The Today Show’s "Anchors Abroad" segment.[5]

[edit] Reception

Dan Martin of the Guardian noted that the episode "moves along the bigger, 50-year story and effectively reboots the show. After seven years of saving the Earth/universe/future of humanity," the show now has new impetus. Martin stated that the revelation that silence will fall when the oldest question in the universe is asked - "Doctor Who?" - will safeguard the programme for future generations.[6]

Gavin Fuller of the Telegraph called the revelation of the Doctor escaping death by using the Teselecta a cop-out and likened it to serials of the thirties where scenes were cut and shown later to create a cliffhanger. However Fuller praised the episode as visually clever and noted that the question "Doctor Who?" harkens back to 1963 and the original theme of the show. Fuller concluded by surmising that Moffat is obviously plotting story arcs in the episode, hinting that the question will be asked at the end of the Doctor's eleventh incarnation.[7]

Neela Debnath of the Independent stated that the series finale was a brainteaser which refused to tie up loose ends neatly. Debnath comments that Moffat is trying to return to the epic story telling that the series once had, spreading it over several series rather than episodes. Concluding, Debnath noted that the episode was underwhelming in terms of drama but overwhelming in terms of information.[8]

[edit] References

[edit] External links

Direct download: TDP_208_The_Wedding_of_River_Song.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:27am UTC

TDP 207: Colony In Space

From Wikipedia with thanks

Colony in Space is a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in 6 weekly parts from April 10 to May 15, 1971.

Contents

[hide]

[edit] Synopsis

Three Time Lords meet at an observatory and discuss the theft of confidential files relating to "the Doomsday Weapon." They begrudgingly realise that only one man can help them — and the Doctor, accompanied by Jo, is temporarily released from his exile and sent in the TARDIS to the desert planet of Uxarieus in the year 2472. There he finds an outpost of human colonists living as farmers. The colony is not a success — the land seems unusually poor and recently they are being besieged by representatives of rapacious mining corporations, and more recently, ferocious reptiles. The colony's governor, Robert Ashe, makes them welcome, and explains the colonists fled a year ago to the planet to escape the overcrowding and pollution on Earth.

Two colonists die in a reptile attack that night, and the next morning a man named Norton arrives at the settlement, claiming that he is from another colony that was wiped out by the reptiles. While the Doctor is investigating the dome of the dead colonists he is surprised by a mining robot controlled by Caldwell, a mineralogist for the IMC. Caldwell invites the Doctor to talk to his bosses and hear their side of the story. His superior, Dent, is a ruthless mining engineer, who has been using the mining robot to scare and now kill the colonists - something which Caldwell finds repellent. Dent knows the planet is rich in rare minerals and wants it for IMC and his greedy troops agree that this should be done at any cost.

The original inhabitants of the planet, known to the colonists as primitives, have a truce with the colonists - but this is tested when Norton kills the colony's scientist and blames it on a primitive, whom he insists are hostile. Later, Norton is seen communicating with Captain Dent, implying that he is in fact a spy sent from IMC to further disrupt the colonists and not the sole survivor of a similar colony as he claimed. The Doctor meanwhile returns to the central dome of the colonists, having evaded an IMC attempt to kill him, and explains to Ashe that the miners are behind the deaths. An Adjudicator from Earth is sent for to deal with the complex claims over the planet - and when he arrives it turns out to be the Master. In this alias he determines that the mining company's claim to the planet is stronger.

The Doctor and Jo have meanwhile ventured to the primitive city. From images on cave walls they interpret it was once home to an advanced civilisation that degraded over time. In the heart of the city, in a room filled with massive machines and a glowing hatch, they encounter a diminutive alien known as the Guardian. It warns them that intruding into the city is punishable by death, and lets them go, but warns them not to return.

The Master's adjudication is heard by a returning Doctor and Jo. Still in the Adjudicator's guise he tells Ashe that an appeal will fail unless there are special circumstances, such as historical interest and is intrigued when Ashe tells him about the primitive city. By this ploy he finds out more about the planet and the primitive city while Ashe is drawn away from the Doctor, who begins to lose his credibility with the colonists. The Master then manipulates the Doctor into accompanying him to the primitive city.

The situation between colonists and miners has meanwhile reached flashpoint with a pitched battle between them. Dent and his forces triumph and he stages a false trial of Ashe and Winton, the most rebellious of the colonists, sentencing them to death but commuting the sentence if all the colonists agree to leave the planet in their damaged old colony ship which first brought them to Uxarieus.

Inside the city, the Master tells the Doctor that the primitives were once an advanced civilisation. Before their civilisation fell apart, they built a super-weapon that was never used - and he wants to claim this weapon for himself. The room with the machinery in the city is the heart of a weapon; so powerful that the Crab Nebula was created during a test firing. The Doctor rejects the Master's overture to help him rule the galaxy using the weapon, stating that absolute power is evil and corrupting. The Guardian appears, demanding an explanation for the intrusion. The Master explains that he's come to restore their civilisation to its former glory. The Doctor argues against him, and the Guardian recalls that the weapon led his race to decay, and its radiation is ruining the planet. It instructs the Doctor to activate the self-destruct, which he does. The city begins to crumble, and the Guardian tells them they must leave before it is too late. While the Doctor and the Master flee the decaying city, they find Caldwell and Jo, and the four get out before the city explodes.

The colonists' ship has meanwhile exploded on take-off as Ashe predicted it would. However, the colony leader was the only one to die. He piloted the ship alone to save his people. Winton and the colonists now emerge from hiding and kill or overpower the IMC men, with Caldwell having switched sides to support the colonists. Amid the confusion, the Master manages to make his escape.

With the battle over, the Doctor explains that the radiation from the weapon was what was killing their crops but this limiting factor has now been removed. Earth has agreed to send a real Adjudicator to Uxarieus, and Caldwell has decided to join the colonists. He tells them that he can help them with their power supply. The Doctor and Jo return to the TARDIS, which returns to UNIT Headquarters mere seconds after it left. Having accomplished what the Time Lords intended, the Doctor is once again trapped on Earth.

[edit] Continuity

  • This is the first time since season six that the Doctor travels to another planet in the TARDIS.
  • Excepting a brief CSO shot of one wall in Terror of the Autons, this is also the first time that the inside of the Master's TARDIS (a redress of the Doctor's TARDIS set) is shown.

[edit] Production

Serial details by episode
EpisodeBroadcast dateRun timeViewership
(in millions)
Archive
"Episode One" 10 April 1971 24:19 7.6 PAL colour conversion
"Episode Two" 17 April 1971 22:43 8.5 PAL colour conversion
"Episode Three" 24 April 1971 23:47 9.5 PAL colour conversion
"Episode Four" 1 May 1971 24:20 8.1 PAL colour conversion
"Episode Five" 8 May 1971 25:22 8.8 PAL colour conversion
"Episode Six" 15 May 1971 25:22 8.7 PAL colour conversion
[1][2][3]
  • Working titles for this story included Colony.
  • Script editor Terrance Dicks has frequently stated that he disliked the original premise of the Doctor being trapped on Earth, and had meant to subvert this plan as soon as he felt he could get away with it. He recalls in a DVD documentary interview (on the Inferno release) having had it pointed out to him by Malcolm Hulke that the format limited the stories to merely two types: alien invasion and mad scientist, and says he'd immediately responded, "Fuck Me! You're right!" (on the The Invasion release). The story is one of the first to use the show for social commentary - in this instance, the dangers of colonialism.[4]

[edit] Cast notes

See also Celebrity appearances in Doctor Who.

  • Bernard Kay appears as Caldwell. This is his fourth and final appearance on the series.
  • Director Michael Briant spoke the commentary accompanying a propaganda film watched by the Doctor on the IMC spaceship in Episode Two. This was a late cast change, and was originally intended for Pat Gorman – who was subsequently still credited on Episodes One and Two as 'Primitive and Voice'.

[edit] Broadcast and reception

16mm colour film trims of location sequences for the story still exist and short clips from this material was used in the BBC TV special "30 years in the Tardis" (1993).

[edit] In print

A novelisation of this serial, written by Malcolm Hulke, was published by Target Books in April 1974 as Doctor Who and the Doomsday Weapon. This was the first serial of the 1971 series to be so adapted; as a result, Hulke breaks continuity by having Jo Grant introduced to the Doctor for the first time, even though on television her introduction was in Terror of the Autons (and this would be reflected in the later novelisation of that serial). There is another extensive Malcolm Hulke prologue as an elderly Time Lord describes the Doctor-Master rivalry to his assistant and learns of the theft of the Doomsday Weapon files. There have been Dutch, Turkish, Japanese and Portuguese language editions. An unabridged reading of the novelisation by actor Geoffrey Beevers was released on CD in September 2007 by BBC Audiobooks.

Doctor Who book
Book cover
Doctor Who and the Doomsday Weapon
Series Target novelisations
Release number 23
Writer Malcolm Hulke
Publisher Target Books
Cover artist Chris Achilleos
ISBN 0-426-10372-6
Release date April 1974

[edit] VHS and DVD releases

  • Although the PAL mastertapes had been wiped NTSC copies were returned to the BBC in 1983 from TV Ontario in Canada. In November 2001, this story was released together with The Time Monster, in a VHS tin box set, entitled The Master. A new transfer was made from the converted NTSC to PAL videotapes but no restoration work was carried out for this release.
  • The story has been scheduled for release on DVD in the UK on 3 October 2011. The single disc release will contain four seconds which were missing from VHS & US masters of the story and which restores two lines of dialogue.[5]

[edit] References

  1. ^ Shaun Lyon et al. (2007-03-31). "Colony in Space". Outpost Gallifrey. Archived from the original on 2006-03-24. Retrieved 2008-08-31.
  2. ^ "Colony in Space". Doctor Who Reference Guide. Retrieved 2008-08-31.
  3. ^ Sullivan, Shannon (2007-07-05). "Colony in Space". A Brief History of Time Travel. Retrieved 2008-08-31.
  4. ^ Butler, David (2007). Time and Relative Dissertations in Space: Critical Perspectives on Doctor Who. Manchester University Press. ISBN 978-0-7190-7682-4.
  5. ^ Marcus (21 July 2011). "Colony in Space DVD release for October". The Doctor Who News Page. Retrieved 22 July 2011.

[edit] External links

[edit] Reviews

[edit] Target novelisation

Direct download: TDP_207_Colony_In_Space.mp3
Category:podcast -- posted at: 12:03pm UTC